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Cincinnati, Customer Experience, eCommerce, Internet of Things, Leadership, Operations, People, Processes, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Teamwork, Technology, Third Party Logistics

Since our founding, we have taken tremendous steps, amplified what is possible. So here’s to the next great leap. We will go with new systems, bold designs, and a sustainable mission. We train, test, and press our solutions spirit into everything we do. We are just getting started.

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B2B Fulfillment, B2C Fulfillment, Cold Supply Chain, Internet of Things, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Sustainability, Team Taylor, Technology, Warehousing, WMS
Contract Warehousing

First things first, what exactly is contract warehousing? Let’s break it down: 

A contract warehouse manages the shipping, receiving, and storage of goods on a contract basis. This warehouse type usually requires a brand to commit to services for a particular period (typically years rather than months). The fee structure also varies based on transactions; it may be a fixed cost, cost-plus, or a combination of both. Contract warehouses can also perform many other services, such as eCommerce, handling, packing, labeling, packaging, fulfillment, and similar activities.

There are a couple of different warehousing options available to brands of all sizes. Some will choose to develop and maintain their own spaces, while others opt for leased space.

A popular option is a contract warehouse space. Here are some benefits:

More economical  


Eliminates risk


Scalability


Reliable 

Lower Capital Investment


Establishing a new warehouse operation can be time-consuming, and sometimes it’s best to focus your efforts on what will lead to business growth, leaving the logistics to a partner (Like #TeamTaylor). Contract warehousing requires less financial investment upfront and less commitment overall. In addition, suppliers, manufacturers, and retailers can benefit from facilities already set up for their specific needs, such as temperature-controlled storage or approved food-grade facilities, and respond to growth quickly and efficiently.

Eliminates Risk


With less of a commitment needed overall, contract warehousing allows any sized business to avoid taking on risks associated with the long-term investment of developing a more extensive warehouse operation.

Scalability


Contract warehousing allows you to use only what you need. This flexibility is vital if your needs change over time, like seasonal changes or new product launches. It also allows smaller businesses to benefit from equipment or procedures that would be too costly to implement independently.

Better Efficiencies of Operations


Contract warehousing can lower your operating and distribution costs immensely. But, of course, warehousing is only one part of your entire business operation. Still, for contractors, that is all they do so they can streamline their processes, lower operational costs and pass on the savings to you.

Work with a team like Taylor!


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Customer Experience, Freight Technology, Intermodal Transportation, Internet of Things, Leadership, Operations, People, Processes, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Sustainability, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Teamwork, Technology, Third Party Logistics

Most people understand that it takes transportation and logistics to get the stuff we all want and rely upon to our homes and offices, but it could be argued that what our industry does is often taken for granted. The well-publicized challenges sourcing, importing and distributing PPE, vaccines, and other critical supplies over the past year and a half have shined a light, once again, on how crucial our industry is to all of us. It is estimated that the transportation and warehousing segment in the U.S. alone accounts for over 5.5 million jobs and that logistics activities account for nearly 8% of everything we make and sell. The third-party logistics segment alone represents a $233 billion industry. We’re important.

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Amazon, Amazon Fulfillment, B2B Fulfillment, B2C Fulfillment, Cincinnati, Customer Experience, eCommerce Fulfillment, Food & Beverage, Food Safety, Freight Brokerage, Fulfillment, Internet of Things, ISDT, Operations, People, Port Services, Processes, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Team Taylor, Third Party Logistics

Are you a west coast based brand? Maybe you’re in California soaking up the sun or Portland, Seattle even? San Fransisco, we see you! While the west coast may be the best, and we aren’t even on a coast there is one thing the midwest has over the west coast. No, it’s not an abundance of corn. It’s actually the perfect place for your brand’s supply chain. Crazy right? Don’t believe us or need more convincing? Watch the below video!

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Internet of Things, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Technology, Truck Driving

2020 is in just a few short months. It’s the year that Gartner predicted that more than 50% of major business processes will incorporate some form of the Internet of Things (IoT). Logistics companies are upon some of these major businesses. Though often disregarded, the application of IoT in supply chain management is already making extraordinary advances and improvements in the logistics landscape. From sensors providing visibility of products in transit to cloud platforms that optimize fleet management and load dispatching. Implementing IoT technology not only ensures efficient operations, but it also gives an edge on competitors and builds your brand. Below are a few of the many functions IoT provides for various logistics companies.


1. Tracking Capabilites

An essential IoT function in the supply chain is tracking and visibility. A Forrester study concluded that 77% of surveyed organizations consider locating objects, containers, and drivers as the top primary functions of supply chain IoT. With RFID and GPS sensors, operators can trace a product, truck, or container in real-time. These technologies also monitor vital details like time spent in transit and temperature control. This data allows operations managers to improve and get a firmer grip on quality control and on-time deliveries. 


2. Fleet Management

To efficiently manage fleet operations, there are now GPS and other tracking technology capabilities that gather data in real-time. These IoT functions are essential for a fleet operations team, so they know the location of the trucks, weather conditions, traffic situations, driving patterns, and average speed. This real-time data helps logistics operators make more efficient routes, manage headcounts, save on fuel cost, and ultimately optimize their fleet.


3. The Ability to Predict Maintenance

Supply chain management is typically an asset-intensive business process. From warehouse equipment to delivery vehicles, these assets need to be continuously monitored to ensure that they are still that processes are running as efficiently as possible. Through the capabilities of smart sensors, operators can determine if a particular asset needs to be serviced. Thus resulting in reduced asset downtime and asset failure, which overall saves money. 


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