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9756 International Blvd Cincinnati, OH 45246 513.771.1850
Cold Supply Chain, Food & Beverage, Food Grade, Food Safety, Freight, Freight Brokerage, LTL, Operations, Processes, Retail, Safety, SQF, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Sustainability, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Third Party Logistics, Value-Added Services
Navigating the 2024 Produce Season with Taylor Logistics

As spring ushers in warmer weather, it also heralds the arrival of produce season, a critical period in the transportation industry. This season brings both opportunities and challenges for Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) shippers. The surge in crop volumes demands careful planning and strategic navigation to ensure smooth operations and cost-effective transportation. In this guide, we will explore the intricacies of the 2024 produce season and how Taylor and our freight services can navigate this dynamic landscape.

Produce season significantly impacts CPG shippers as carriers focus on transporting high crop volumes. This shift in volume tightens capacity, leading to increased rates and challenges for unprepared shippers. The seasonal impact typically begins in late spring and spreads from warmer regions to northern areas as the weather warms. Despite not directly engaging in produce production or shipment, CPG shippers are directly affected by this phenomenon, which influences transportation performance and expenditure.

Refrigerated transportation becomes particularly vital and in high demand during the produce season. Securing this specialized transportation can prove challenging without the assistance of a logistics provider boasting an expansive network. While rate spikes are expected during this period, proactive measures such as pre-booking capacity or optimizing transportation networks can mitigate the impact.

The duration and intensity of disruptions vary, ranging from short-term fluctuations lasting less than a month to prolonged peaks. These fluctuations are influenced by factors such as latitude and the predominant crops in a region.

At Taylor, we understand the critical importance of adaptability and foresight in navigating the nuances of produce season. Our commitment to providing innovative solutions and reliable services ensures that CPG shippers can confidently and efficiently navigate this dynamic landscape.

As the 2024 produce season unfolds, we stand ready to support shippers with industry-leading expertise and unparalleled freight services. By partnering with us, shippers can unlock new opportunities and overcome challenges, ensuring seamless transportation operations even amidst the complexities of produce season.


Interested in maximizing success during the 2024 produce season? Partner with Taylor Logistics for expert guidance and seamless freight solutions. For prompt assistance, email us at info@taylorlog.com or call us at 513-771-1850. Let’s navigate this season professionally and efficiently together!

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Cincinnati 3PL

In today’s fast-paced and highly competitive business environment, logistics and supply chain management play a crucial role in the success of any company. One strategic approach that has gained significant traction in recent years is the utilization of a 3PL (Third-Party Logistics) network of warehouses. Among the various locations available for such a network, Cincinnati has emerged as an ideal choice due to its strategic positioning and numerous advantages. In this blog, we will explore the benefits of having a 3PL network of warehouses in Cincinnati, perfectly positioned to enhance your business operations.

1. Strategic Geographic Location: 

Cincinnati’s central location in the United States makes it a prime hub for distribution and transportation. Situated within a one-day drive of two-thirds of the U.S. population, it provides easy access to major markets in the Midwest and along the East Coast. This strategic location minimizes transportation costs and reduces transit times, ensuring faster deliveries to customers.

2. Cost Efficiency: 

Cincinnati offers a cost-effective solution for warehousing and distribution. Compared to major coastal cities, the cost of real estate and labor is significantly lower, allowing businesses to allocate more resources to other critical aspects of their operations. This cost-efficiency extends to transportation, as reduced travel distances translate to lower shipping expenses.

3. Scalability and Flexibility: 

Partnering with 3PL providers in Cincinnati allows businesses to scale their operations up or down based on demand. Warehouses in the region are equipped to handle various types of goods, and their flexible storage solutions ensure that your inventory is managed efficiently, even during peak seasons.

4. Access to Expertise: 

Cincinnati has a well-established logistics and transportation industry. Partnering with 3PL providers in the region grants access to experienced professionals who understand the local market intricacies, compliance regulations, and best practices. This local expertise can be invaluable in streamlining your supply chain operations.

5. Reduced Transit Times: 

With Cincinnati’s proximity to major highways, rail networks, and air cargo facilities, your products can reach their destinations faster. Reduced transit times not only satisfy customer expectations for quick deliveries but also help in optimizing inventory levels and minimizing carrying costs.

6. Mitigated Risk: 

Natural disasters and disruptions in one region can have a significant impact on the supply chain. Cincinnati’s geographical stability and resilience to extreme weather events make it a safe choice for warehousing. Businesses can rest assured that their inventory is less susceptible to unforeseen disruptions.

7. Improved Customer Service: 

Faster deliveries, reduced shipping costs, and reliable service contribute to enhanced customer satisfaction. By positioning your 3PL network in Cincinnati, you can provide your customers with a competitive advantage that sets you apart from the competition.

8. Focus on Core Competencies: 

Outsourcing your warehousing and distribution needs to a 3PL provider in Cincinnati allows you to concentrate on your core business activities, such as product development, marketing, and strategic planning. This can lead to increased innovation and profitability.

In conclusion, establishing a 3PL network of warehouses in Cincinnati, with its strategic location and various advantages, can be a game-changer for businesses looking to optimize their supply chain operations. Whether you are a growing e-commerce company or a large manufacturer, Cincinnati’s perfectly positioned logistics infrastructure can help you reduce costs, improve efficiency, and ultimately deliver better service to your customers. Consider leveraging this thriving logistics hub to propel your business to new heights in today’s competitive marketplace.

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Customer Experience, Fleet, Processes, Retail, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management

As the 2023 hurricane season approaches, businesses must prepare for the potential disruptions that these natural phenomena can bring. A resilient supply chain is essential to mitigate risks, ensure business continuity, and protect customer satisfaction. In this blog post, we will explore the critical challenges posed by hurricanes and outline best practices to fortify your supply chain against their impacts.

Stay Informed

Keeping a close eye on weather forecasts and monitoring updates from reputable sources is essential. Establishing a dedicated team responsible for tracking and analyzing storm developments will ensure timely and accurate information. Leverage technology and advanced analytics tools to gain insights into potential storm paths, intensity, and estimated impact zones.

Risk Assessment and Contingency Planning

Conduct a comprehensive risk assessment to identify vulnerabilities within your supply chain. Evaluate the potential impact of hurricanes on transportation routes, production facilities, warehouses, and suppliers. Develop contingency plans that address various scenarios, allowing for quick response and adaptation when necessary.

Diversify and Strengthen Supplier Networks

Relying heavily on a single supplier or geographical region can magnify the impact of a hurricane. Consider diversifying your supplier network to mitigate risks. Collaborate with suppliers in different areas, ensuring they possess the capacity and capabilities to handle increased demand during a hurricane’s aftermath.

Establish Effective Communication Channels

Establish open lines of communication with suppliers, transportation partners, and customers. Promptly share information regarding any disruptions, delays, or changes in operations. Maintain regular contact throughout the storm and its aftermath to minimize uncertainties and facilitate coordinated recovery efforts.

Robust Inventory Management

Maintain optimal inventory levels by strategically positioning stock at multiple locations. Ensure adequate stock reserves in warehouses and distribution centers outside hurricane-prone areas. Leverage forecasting tools and demand sensing technologies to anticipate changes in demand patterns and adjust inventory accordingly.

Collaborative Partnerships

Forge strong partnerships with logistics providers and transportation companies with experience handling natural disasters. Collaborate closely with them to develop contingency plans, ensure prioritized service during emergencies, and establish alternative routes if necessary.

Protect Infrastructure and Assets

Invest in fortifying critical infrastructure, such as warehouses and distribution centers, to withstand hurricane-force winds and potential flooding. Implement preventive measures, such as securing loose equipment and utilizing storm shutters or protective covers. Regularly review insurance coverage to ensure it adequately protects your assets.

Employee Safety and Well-being

Prioritize the safety and well-being of your employees during a hurricane event. Develop robust emergency response plans that outline evacuation procedures, shelter arrangements, and communication protocols. Conduct training sessions to educate employees on safety measures and emergency preparedness.

The 2023 hurricane season brings challenges and opportunities for businesses operating within vulnerable areas. By proactively implementing these best practices and continuously refining your supply chain strategies, you can enhance resilience and maintain operational continuity despite adverse weather events. Remember, preparation is critical, and adapting swiftly will enable your supply chain to weather the storm and emerge more robust than ever.

(Note: This blog post provides general guidance, and it is important to consult with industry experts and consider specific regional factors when implementing hurricane preparedness measures for your supply chain.)

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3PL Provider Taylor Logistics Cincinnati Ohio

Companies always look for ways to reduce costs and increase efficiency in today’s highly competitive global economy. To handle their supply chain needs, many companies outsource to third-party logistics providers (3PL).In addition to warehousing, order fulfillment, and transportation, 3PLs offer various services. The benefits of these services can be significant for companies, but they need to be appropriately considered before deciding to use any 3PL. To evaluate a 3PL provider, you should follow these ten steps.

Compare Costs

It is essential to compare the costs of their services to in-house operations as a first step. By doing this, you can determine whether 3PL’s services are cost-effective and if they provide value for money. Don’t forget to factor in additional costs such as setup, technology, and transportation fees.

Analyze On-Time Delivery Rates

An essential aspect of 3PL management is measuring on-time delivery rates. If the 3PL meets customer expectations, this will give you an idea of its reliability. On-time delivery rates are vital for companies that operate in industries where timeliness is critical.

Inventory Accuracy

Inventory accuracy is another important metric to look for in a 3PL provider. This will let you know how well the third-party logistics provider is managing your inventory and whether they can monitor stock levels. Since this can significantly contribute to errors and delays, measuring the 3PL’s capacity to track inventory in transit is also critical.

Customer Satisfaction

Numerous methods, including customer surveys, reviews, and feedback, can be used to gauge customer happiness. You can determine how well the 3PL is meeting consumer expectations by asking for a customer promoter score and referrals.

Return on Investment

Keeping track of your costs will provide insight into the amount of extra revenue your business obtains from the 3PL. In addition, analyzing the revenue generated by the 3PL and comparing it to the costs associated with their services will enable you to gain a more comprehensive understanding of your overall return on investment.

Results

Following the steps outlined above can help you evaluate a 3PL provider and see if they are providing value for the money. With the right metrics in place, you can make an informed decision about whether or not to continue working with them.

Bottom Line

?Selecting the right 3PL provider is an important decision that can significantly impact your company’s success. Evaluating a 3PL provider’s industry experience, technology and tools, services offered, customer service, pricing and agreements, security and compliance, scalability and flexibility, and reputation will help organizations meet their logistics needs and gain a competitive edge. As a result, you can make more informed decisions.

It’s essential to thoroughly research any 3PL provider before making a decision. This includes asking the right questions and conducting due diligence to verify vendor credentials and capabilities. By selecting a 3PL provider that best suits their needs, companies can improve the efficiency of their supply chain, reduce costs, and improve the customer experience. Questions or need to speak with an expert? Talk with Taylor!

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This week, our Monroe team underwent a Safe Quality Foods (SQF) audit scoring an outstanding 98%. This is an exceptional accomplishment, as we continually strive for the highest standard in food safety for our business partners. A special kudos to the entire Monroe team. We will be adding yet another championship banner!

What is SQF?

The Safe Quality Food (SQF) Program is a rigorous and credible food safety and quality program recognized by retailers, brand owners, and food service providers worldwide. Recognized by the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), the SQF family of food safety and quality codes are designed to meet industry, customer, and regulatory requirements for all food supply chain sectors – from the farm to retail stores. This rigorous farm-to-fork food safety and quality certification also help food producers assure their buyers that their food products meet the highest possible global food safety standards.

Why is SQF important for your brand?

This farm-to-fork food safety and quality certification helps food producers assure their buyers that food products have been grown, processed, prepared, and handled according to the highest possible global food safety standards. It can immediately improve your standing in the eyes of new partners and deals. For everyone at Taylor, this achievement is an excellent validation of our hard work and our team’s commitment to safe food operations. For you, it means increased protection in the event of recalls, improved operational efficiencies in our work together, managed risks, and peace of mind with certified due diligence.

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Four Functions of 3PL Providers

As a business expands and you need to get products in new markets to more customers, there comes a time when it must determine whether to outsource its supply chain operations.

To meet customer demand, shippers turn to a third-party logistics (3PL) provider to do just that.

But not all 3PLs offer the same services and capabilities. For example, some just focus on transportation, and some just on fulfillment. But what about a full-service logistics provider that can do it all? Learn more about the functions of a full-service 3PL like Taylor.

1. Shipping and Receiving

Taylor helps companies with shipping and receiving; our brokerage team manages the shipping process from start to finish. As a technology-driven organization, our transportation management system (TMS) allows for managing carrier relations, freight data, and matrix reports for real-time visibility and increased transparency throughout the shipping process.

2. Transportation

As a multi-service 3PL that also handles transportation, we are responsible for transporting goods between locations, from manufacturer to fulfillment to any brick-and-mortar store, and even direct parcels to your doorstep. Because we have our in-house brokerage and local Cincinnati fleet, there’s no need to leverage another partner to complete any shipping needs.

3. Warehousing

Warehousing is typically the most common function of a third-party logistics provider. To no surprise, warehousing is a large portion of our service portfolio; from multi-client public warehouses to dedicated client contract facilities, we’ve altered our warehouse services to meet the needs of our business partners. Taylor provides customizable ways to handle storage, distribution, and transportation.

4. Value-Added Services

In addition to transportation, warehousing, and distribution, several 3PLs like Taylor also provide a wide variety of value-added services, including eCommerce, pick & pack, kitting, custom labeling, manufacturing, Amazon prep services, and design. By outsourcing these services, business partners can focus on their core business. 

Need a full-service 3PL partner?

Fill out the form below and a member of our team will reach out asap. Questions? Inbox us at info@taylorlog.com or call 513-771-1850

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It takes a lot of bandwidth to operate a retail business. Whether you are an online retailer or run a brick-and-mortar business, you depend on the efficient movement of freight to maintain your operations. Logistics is the main component of any retail operation, from receiving inventory to shipping orders directly to customers. The amount of resources a retailer spends on operating its supply chain is unknown to most casual shoppers. This is an area where working with an experienced 3PL can be incredibly beneficial for any retailer.

What’s the Role of a 3PL?

There are multiple roles that today’s third-party logistics providers take on for their clients. For retailers specifically, they are essentially outsourced agent that takes care of numerous supply chain functions. Partnering with a 3PL allows a retailer to focus on driving sales, improving customer service, and other daily operations that help them increase sales and, thus, make more profits. Specifically, a 3PL can handle several specific logistics functions, including:

Scalable Services

A 3PL allows you to analyze your labor, transportation, and spacing needs depending on your business parameters. Businesses that focus more heavily on seasonal sales can benefit from this practice. You can always ramp up deliveries, warehouse space, and any other logistics a 3PL can provide when consumer demand dictates.

Cost-efficiency

Many companies assume that outsourcing to a third party by default means spending more on service fees. However, all the efforts of a 3PL will eventually save you money. Ultimately, the overall cost will be less than an in-house supply chain management. A 3PL is a one-stop shop for most of your supply chain needs. You do not have to invest in warehousing, technology, or a logistics team.

Bulk Shipping Rates

Shipping rates, especially spot rates, can fluctuate weekly depending on several outside sources, even daily in some cases. As a result, retail companies need stability in the market to ship their products. Bulk shipping rates help that happen. This is where 3PLs can help, especially since many retail companies need the negotiating power of a 3PL.

Distribution Network

3PLs have contacts throughout the country. If your business grows, a 3PL can offer additional resources from those within its network to assist that growth. At Taylor, we have a carrier network of 60,000+. With a carrier size that large, we can find you lanes and capacity to move your freight.

Ready to partner with a 3PL? Talk with Taylor

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The 2023 Inbound Logistics Planner is here, and you can read all about Taylor! From our outstanding team to what sets us apart and how Taylor technology improves customers’ supply chains. Here’s our entry:

As the longest-standing 3PL, we know that offering one supply chain service decreases overall efficiency and sustainability; that’s why we’ve altered our business to be a full-service omnichannel 3PL for our customers.

What Does Taylor Do Differently?

We provide SQF food-grade public warehousing, contract dedicated warehousing, B2B & B2C fulfillment services, freight brokerage, asset local Cincinnati fleet, dedicated fleet services, D2C e-commerce, packaging, drayage/ port management services, kitting, and subscription services.

We support large and mid-sized companies in the food, beverage, flavoring, ingredient, pet food, CPG, retail, PPE, packaging, and automotive spaces.

Creating Long-Lasting Relationships with Our Customers

As a privately held family business with over 170 years of experience, we are an agile company that scales and grows with our customers. We are small enough to care and have excellent customer service with dedicated teams to some of our clients, yet large enough to have the technology and infrastructure needed to scale. Our goal is always to exceed customers’ expectations and build long-term relationships.

Technology-Driven Operations

A part of our competitive advantage is that we continuously invest in technology to offer our customers the latest and greatest for complete customization, visibility, tracking, and reporting. Technology creates a stronger bond between our team and our customers, mainly due to improved communication, information sharing, and meaningful collaboration that produces better results. From finding the best shipping rates to inventory optimization and forecasting, our systems are paramount in customers’ cost-saving strategies.

Emphasis on Food Safety

While we partner with several industries, we pride ourselves on an extensive food-safety program that is rooted in principles verified by the Safe Quality Foods Institute (SQF). All of our public warehouses are food-grade, and we offer SQF to be established at our contractual locations as well.

It’s Because of Our Team

We make supply chains stronger. This industry requires hard work and dedication; our team always makes the impossible possible for our customers. Through a collaborative and safe culture, we are always one team, one mission.

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Each year, Robert Handfield, Ph.D. of North Carolina State University, predicts what’s in store for global commerce and supply chains for the next 365 days. While these predictions are perhaps not completely original, his takeaways and supporting evidence are worth considering. Please see the full article from NCSU here.

Inflation will persist.  Jason Miller from Michigan State is an expert at navigating the many different publicly available government database, and interpreting the tea leaves.  He writes a weekly blog on Linked In which I follow religiously.  He is the most accurate forecaster I know, because unlike many speculators and economists, his observations are based on actual data!    He believes that inflation isn’t going to go down going into 2023 – but will persist.  He writes that“While it is good news that we are starting to see the inflation of goods slow down, I would caution anyone who expects goods to go through a deflationary cycle that the data (to me) isn’t pointing in this direction to a meaningful degree. Data below from three series from the BLS PPI program obtained from FRED (with call codes after the labels), all set such that 100 = January 2019.  Implication:  the best-case scenario I see for the price of finished goods is that their prices stay relatively unchanged from the 3rd quarter of 2022….we are going to see meaningful deflation in finished goods prices as we move into 2023, which will in turn impact PCE price index that the Fed monitors for consumer inflation.”   Unfortunately, this also means that the Fed will likely keep interest rates high through much of 2023 – and will likely increase rates again in February and June.  Inflation is indeed going down slowly– but not as fast as the markets would like.

Inventory will remain bloated for the first half of 2023, – and supplier relationships will be tested.  Here again, my prior blog notes how much inventory we have in supply chains today – and how certain parties are pushing back their excessive demand forecasts, and punishing their suppliers.   For instance, a large apparel brand requested about 20 of their largest textile mills (many in Pakistan, Singapore, China, and other regions) to travel all the way to San Francisco for a “Vendor Summit”.  They then sequestered each individual in a room, and two individuals came in and told them that they needed to reduce their prices by 20%.  Walmart  is moving their vendors from FOB (Free on Board) to domestic buying, and the shift is happening fast.  Walmart will pay more for domestic sources, but will not be burdened with the inventory and purchasing FOB.  They are also canceling orders, decreasing quantities, and deducting off invoices, which they claim as “chargebacks” for “late deliveries”, from shipments which were received as late as last year.  These kinds of behaviors by buyers will come back to bite them in the future…

Despite having more inventory – we won’t stop having shortages. Unfortunately, a lot of the bloated inventory is stuff that consumers don’t want – or can’t afford.  But that doesn’t mean we will stop having shortages of critical materials.  One reason for this is that the COVID crisis in China is escalating to incredible levels, and that is shutting down a lot of manufacturing hubs.  In particular, a lot of maintenance parts for equipment, replacement parts for appliances, automobiles, and larger (>48 nm) chips are still produced in Asia – and we will continue to see shortages of these component parts.  That means that repair may take longer than you think.  Labor and material shortages for factories are going down – but still are at a much higher rate than they were in 2019.

Mexico will become a destination hub for many companies in the US – but within reason. As I noted in a prior blog, and as discussed in the New York Times today – Mexico is a great option – but the capacity isn’t there yet.  More importantly, the supply chain isn’t there yet!  I spoke to a CPO who mentioned that his CEO was a big proponent of bringing all supply to Mexico – but despite this fact, we are still largely dependent on China for raw materials!  As pointed out in the NY Times – even apparel manufacturing in Mexico is largely dependent on fabric produced entirely in China!  As such, it is unlikely we are going to lose our dependence on Chinese products.  Price is still the determining factor here.  Chinese manufacturing is of such scale, that moving it to the US or Mexico is unlikely.

The US Government will play more of a role in promoting domestic supply chains. Not only did the US government, pass the CHIPS Act – but they are actively promoting the domestic production of semiconductors.  As noted in one of my blogs, however, producing a fab plant is a good step – but the supply chain for chips is still largely in Taiwan.  There is massive flux in the chip industry – which seems to be on a different cycle than most demand cycles.  What was once a one year backlog has shrunk and chips are now readily available – to the point where semiconductor companies are cutting back on capital investment!  This will continue to be a real problem – and I believe we will see “capacity as a service” models begin to emerge in the chip sector – where buyers will reserve capacity based on actual forecasts, not guesses or bets on what they think they will need next year.  This will stabilize production – and lead to improved availability and assurance of supply.

Healthcare supply chains will remain strained. Despite having a lot more PPE in warehouses, hospitals are still struggling with a lot of shortages.  Jim Wilson, an expert in medical intelligence, advocates that hospital monitoring programs is a critical area of government investment.  One area is generic drugs – such as amoxycillin.  We wll have shortages of baby formula as well.  For this reason, I believe the government should be creating incentives to increasingly healthcare supply chain.  To address this issue, one recommendation I am advocating would be to create government industrial policies that are targeted at supporting a domestic “stop gap” manufacturing capability. Secondly, partnerships should be developed with distributors to enable visibility into their inventory systems, and ensure they enter contracts which set aside inventory for government allocation under different conditions of duress.  This will require a set of common data standards and a common architecture to create a dashboard and control tower.  In addition, a multi-agency materials inventory portfolio based on in-depth supply market analysis is needed.  At a minimum, this should include specialists in the following categories:  semiconductors, precious metals, electric vehicle batteries, medical supplies (PPE, gowns, gloves), medical devices, pharmaceuticals, plastics and resins, medical equipment, biologics, healthcare personnel, and respiratory products. This will require team of supply market analysts with special knowledge of these categories, that track the condition of critical supply markets for medical supplies, the supply risks within those markets, and acquisition strategies to manage the risks.  Multi-tier supply chain mapping can provide clues as to critical points of risk that can “shut down” the US healthcare sector, based on multiple forms of risk assessment.

Growth in 2023 will be positive – but lean. As noted in a lecture by the Economist which I attended, the greatest risks looming ahead are concentrated in 2023.  Next year will see some positive growth but only 1.7%, reflecting slowing growth in the US in China and recession in Europe.  Global monetary tightening will take some time to kick in – likely in the second half of 2023.  The US will likely see only 0.5% growth in 2023, the EU 0.4%, which in turn will impact other regions of the world.  China will likely see a modest rebound after the 2022 slump, moving to only 5% growth.  However, there are always risks that will move the needle, including the escalation of the Ukraine war, more COVID-19 variants, spikes in energy prices, and sovereign debt pile-ups.

Government regulation of Artificial Intelligence will increase. As I noted in a blog of a recent SAS INNOVATE conference, Henry Kissinger described AI as the new frontier of arms control during a forum at Washington National Cathedral on Nov. 16. If leading powers don’t find ways to limit AI’s reach, he said, “it is simply a mad race for some catastrophe.”  The former secretary of state cautioned that AI systems could transform warfare just as they have chess or other games of strategy — because they are capable of making moves that no human would consider but that have devastatingly effective consequences.  This is true not just in warfare, but also in supply chains.  As we move towards a digital future where we increasingly will be ceding control to machines who call the shots, not humans, what are the risks of doing so?  Increasingly, more and more data is being stuffed into the cloud, which certainly allows us access to more readily access reams of data which can be processed by algorithms for decision-making.  We have to be able to trust these algorithms to make the right decisions.  But driving towards AI standards to increase trustworthiness is easier said than done.  The UK has also begun pursuing this goal, as has the EU, who are likely to explicitly define AI and how to use it.  The government will begin to mandate a more  comprehensive approach, which spans the entire organization.  Three primary elements determine the fiduciary responsibility for trustworthy AI:  Duty of Care, the Business Judgement rule, and Duty of Compliance Oversight.   These pillars are required to understand the historical biases that so often find their way into AI algorithms, which have created historical injustices and inequities, meaning that the government is surely going to step in.

Electric vehicle parts will remain in short supply. In a recent blog, I noted how there is still a massive shortage of the so-called “green metals” required to meet the burgeoning demand for EV’s. Environmentalists and automotive companies have committed to converting all of their vehicles to electric power.  GM has committed to 30 new electric vehicles by 2025.  Ford is committing to an all-electric vehicle platform with zero emissions by 2035.  But nobody is talking about the supply chain for these vehicles, and the capacity required to build them.  Converting an entire supply base of automotive suppliers, who are all focused on building of combustion engine-powered vehicles, and moving them all to electric vehicles, will be a superhuman feat.  What will happen to those manufacturers that can’t or won’t convert?  They go out of business?  And is there enough capacity to produce the new types of vehicles?  And what raw materials are required to convert to EV in the future?  I don’t think executives have really given any meaningful thought to the answers to these questions yet… I predict a rough road ahead for EV’s.  Perhaps I’m a voice in the wilderness – except maybe for Toyota – they have the same doubts as I do.

Demand for supply chain graduates will go through the roof in the next two years. To summarize – global supply chains remain fragile – and we are in a period where things are starting to change.  Supply chains will look very different in two or three years from what they are today. 

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Seasonal Demand Warehouse

What is seasonal demand? 

Seasonal inventory refers to products that sell at a higher velocity during particular times of the year. For example, most companies experience an influx in seasonal demand during the holiday season, and many may stock holiday-specific SKUs that they don’t sell year-round. Other brands may experience seasonal spikes according to changes in weather, sports seasons, or secondary holidays such as Valentine’s Day or Mother’s Day.

Take advantage of peaks in demand

Forecasting for seasonal variances will ensure you have sufficient levels of stock available to take advantage of increases in product demand at peak times of the year. If you rely on your busy seasons to make the most of your money, you must be on top of your game and ensure optimum product availability.

Prevent excess stock levels

Equally, it’s important that you don’t want to over-forecast for seasonal demand fluctuations. Investing too much money in inventory can lead to cash flow problems and an unhealthy balance sheet. If you have excess stock at the end of a season, you face the dilemma of selling it off at a discounted rate or taking on the burden of inflated carrying costs until demand picks up again.

Seasonal methods for managing inventory 

There are five primary methods for managing inventory, and any of them could be appropriate for managing seasonal inventory, depending on SKU profile, sales velocity, and current business operations.

First in First Out (FIFO): The FIFO inventory method works by using the oldest inventory (first in) to fulfill orders first (first out). The FIFO method is appropriate for perishable and highly seasonal products and can increase margins on items that experience price hikes during times of high seasonal demand.

Last in First Out (LIFO): The LIFO inventory method uses the newest inventory (last in) to fulfill orders first (first out). The LIFO method can be used to quickly recoup expenses on products acquired at a premium seasonal price, either at the raw materials level or as finished goods.

Just in Time (JIT): The JIT inventory method is the method most commonly used by SMB’s because it requires the least intensive demand forecasting. JIT supply chains are replenished on an as needed basis. They are a high-risk supply chain management strategy and can reward merchants with increased capital on hand. Still, as we’ve seen with recent supply chain disruptions, they can also leave merchants with empty shelves when seasonal demand hits.

Economic Order Quantity (EOQ): The EOQ method determines ideal inventory levels using three metrics: customer demand, acquisition cost, and holding cost. The EOQ method can drastically cut inventory carry costs but requires advanced demand forecasting models supported by a lengthy sales history.

ABC Analysis:  An ABC analysis prioritizes SKUs by lumping them into three categories: A — high-value products with a low contribution margin, B — mid-value products selling at a mid-range velocity, C — high-velocity products with a low margin. An ABC analysis helps merchants prioritize the SKUs that ultimately drive their business’s profitability and may prompt them to reconsider their product profile entirely.

How are You Managing Seasonal Demand Forecasting?

Are you looking for a strategy that can help you improve your seasonal demand forecasting? #TeamTaylor can help. Contact us today to learn more about our data-driven warehousing and fulfillment services.

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It’s that time of the year again when shoppers decide what gifts to buy, and merchants prepare for the busiest time of the year. However, to have a successful holiday season, consumers and eCommerce businesses must be aware of the 2022 holiday shipping deadlines.

Holiday shipping deadlines are a vital tool to help merchants manage customer expectations and minimize poor customer experiences resulting from late delivery. In this post, you’ll find the 2022 holiday shipping deadlines for USPS, FedEx, and UPS – along with some other pearls of wisdom for managing holiday shipping.

USPS Shipping Deadlines

USPS Holiday Shipping Deadlines

UPS Shipping Deadlines

UPS Holiday Shipping Deadlines

FedEx Shipping Deadlines

FedEx Holiday Shipping Deadlines

What Merchants Need to Keep in Mind for the 2022 Holiday Shipping Season

Holiday shopping will begin earlier

Thanks to worries about more price increases and the need to spread out holiday spending, consumers are starting their gift-buying earlier than ever before.

According to 4Over’s recent survey, 73% of consumers are expecting additional price hikes during the holiday season. As a result, 31% say they plan to start their holiday shopping in early November, while 23% plan to buy gifts as soon as possible.

Naturally, this has a big impact on what proportion of orders are going to be placed at what time. So while earlier shopping means fewer orders will come close to shipping cutoff dates, there are still the laggards to watch out for.

Questions? Talk With Taylor Today!

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Amazon Fulfillment, B2B Fulfillment, B2C Fulfillment, Customer Experience, D2C, Data, eCommerce, eCommerce Fulfillment, Fleet, Freight, Freight Brokerage, Freight Technology, Fulfillment, Ominchannel, Operations, Packaging, Processes, Retail, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Third Party Logistics

With pumpkin spice season creeping upon us, many shippers and retailers are already deep into holiday logistical planning. Unfortunately, supply chain disruptions have felt like the movie “Groundhog Day” with the main character’s alarm clock representing the latest unexpected challenge. Since early 2020, many companies have struggled to keep products in stock and fulfill orders promptly. As forward-thinking brands look toward the fast-approaching 2022 holiday shopping season, it appears disruptions will again take a starring role.

Preparing for the Holiday Rush 

Stock up on Holiday Inventory


According to Adobe Analytics, out-of-stock messages have increased by 172% since January 2020. Lack of stock is a surefire way to turn off customers and make them look elsewhere. Throughout the holidays, ensure that you have adequate supplies of your best-sellers and coordinate often with your partners. Additionally, logistics operations may experience delays during this period, due to the influx of many moving orders. When the shopping surge starts, it’s better to replenish your inventory early, so you can get those orders moving as soon as possible. Avoid long wait times and prevent customers from getting frustrated when they learn their preferred gift is out-of-stock.

Create a Redundancy Plan 


There’s nothing worse than a package not reaching its final destination on time, especially during the holidays. So create a backup shipping plan to ensure your products are delivered on time. Like last year, some carriers will have trouble getting your packages out quickly and to your customers on time during this holiday season. To ensure packages get to customers during a surge, it’s advisable to have a relationship with a backup carrier. You never know where or when issues will arise. If you can quickly shift from one carrier to another in the event of any problems, you and your customers will be happy. 

Increase Real-Time Network Visibility and Predictability


In today’s dynamic retail supply chain, visibility and predictability are crucial. The most advanced customer portals for shippers can process thousands of data points within seconds, allowing them to offer business intelligence and predictive analytics to help avoid delays. As a result, shippers can gain a rapid understanding of changing transit times that are imperative in calculating dynamic lead times to be used in near-term order cycle management. Taylor provides their customers with a custom portal for real-time visibility for proactive decision-making. 

The Time to Plan is Now – Partner with a 3PL Today 

The best way to prepare is to start early and proactively address any shortcomings that could impact consumers. Some brands have already started placing orders to build up inventory in anticipation of the holiday rush. By prioritizing a holiday logistics strategy and dedicating time and energy to optimize related processes, brands can break out of the “Groundhog Day” loop to achieve sales goals and exceed customer expectations this holiday season. Leave the logistics to us and focus on your core business – partner with #TeamTaylor today.

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B2B Fulfillment, B2C Fulfillment, Cincinnati, Cold Supply Chain, Customer Experience, eCommerce, eCommerce Fulfillment, Food & Beverage, Food Grade, Food Safety, Freight, Freight Brokerage, Fulfillment, Key Performing Indicators, Leadership, Ominchannel, Operations, Packaging, Processes, Retail, Safety, SQF, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Third Party Logistics, Warehousing

CINCINNATI, OH—Aug. 15, 2022 — Food Logistics, the only publication exclusively dedicated to covering the movement of product through the global cold food supply chain, named Taylor Logistics Inc. as one of the winners of the 2022 Top 3PL & Cold Storage Providers award, which recognizes leading third-party logistics and cold storage providers in the cold food and beverage industry.

“These past 18 months have been so challenging for U.S. supply chains. It’s the continuous bottlenecks that require fleets to re-tool and pivot accordingly. But, it’s the drivers, the fleet, the warehouses and software/technologies that really keep today’s supply chains in line,” says Marina Mayer, Editor-in-Chief of Food Logistics and Supply & Demand Chain Executive. “These 3PLs and cold storage providers have collaborated on all facets of their operations to achieve full visibility, complete forecasting, end-to-end leverage and the ultimate in sustainability. Now is the time to honor and celebrate those companies making magic happen behind the frontlines.”

Recipients of this year’s award will be profiled in Food Logistics’ July/Aug 2022 print issue as well as online at www.FoodLogistics.com. Go to https://www.foodlogistics.com/awards to learn more about other Food Logistics’ awards.

About Food Logistics

Food Logistics reaches more than 26,000 supply chain executives in the global food and beverage industries, including executives in the food sector (growers, producers, manufacturers, wholesalers and grocers) and the logistics section (transportation, warehousing, distribution, software and technology) who share a mutual interest in the operations and business aspects of the global cold food supply chain. Food Logistics and sister publication Supply & Demand Chain Executive are also home to L.I.N.K. and L.I.N.K. Educate podcast channels, L.I.N.K. Live, SCN Summit, SupplyChainLearningCenter.com and more. Go to www.FoodLogistics.com to learn more.

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SQF-warehousing-Cincinnati

This week, our Monroe team underwent a Safe Quality Foods (SQF) audit scoring an outstanding 97%. This is an exceptional accomplishment, as we continually strive for the highest standard in food safety for our business partners. A special kudos to the entire Monroe team. We will be adding yet another championship banner!

What is SQF?

The Safe Quality Food (SQF) Program is a rigorous and credible food safety and quality program recognized by retailers, brand owners, and food service providers worldwide. Recognized by the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), the SQF family of food safety and quality codes are designed to meet industry, customer, and regulatory requirements for all food supply chain sectors – from the farm to retail stores. This rigorous farm-to-fork food safety and quality certification also help food producers assure their buyers that their food products meet the highest possible global food safety standards.

Why is SQF important for your brand?

This farm-to-fork food safety and quality certification helps food producers assure their buyers that food products have been grown, processed, prepared, and handled according to the highest possible global food safety standards. It can immediately improve your standing in the eyes of new partners and deals. For everyone at Taylor, this achievement is an excellent validation of our hard work and our team’s commitment to safe food operations. For you, it means increased protection in the event of recalls, improved operational efficiencies in our work together, managed risks, and peace of mind with certified due diligence.

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On March 28th through the 31st, companies involved in manufacturing, warehousing, logistics, and distribution will gather in person in Atlanta, Georgia, to learn and take action at MODEX 2022. Team Taylor will be there, and we want to talk with you! We are here for you if you have any questions or want to chat on areas of interest in fulfillment, packaging, eCommerce, operations, transportation, food safety, and logistics.

MODEX 2022 is a space to make new contacts, discover cutting-edge solutions, and learn the latest trends that are sure to give you a leg up on the competition. From illuminating education to next-generation technology and equipment in action, MODEX lets you see what’s coming — and take advantage of it to power your supply chain with more possibilities for years to come.

Find the best the industry has to offer to:

Connect with over 900 of the leading providers and see in-person, in-action how their efficiency-enhancing and cost-cutting equipment and technology solutions can futureproof your supply chain.


Learn from the industry’s best minds how key industry trends and innovations can transform your manufacturing and supply chain operations during 100+ free education sessions and four powerful keynotes.


Meet with your industry peers from the U.S. and countries across the globe.

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BevNet-Live-2021-Santa-Monica-Taylor-Logistics-

On Dec. 6 and 7, the beverage industry will gather in person in Santa Monica, CA, to learn and take action at BevNet Live! Team Taylor will be there, and we want to talk with you! We are here for you if you have any questions or want to chat on areas of interest in fulfillment, packaging, eCommerce, operations, supply chain, and logistics. Are you going to BevNet Live? Let us know!

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eCommerce, eCommerce Fulfillment, Food & Beverage, Fulfillment, Lean, Ominchannel, Operations, Packaging, Retail, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Technology, Third Party Logistics, Warehousing

It’s time to start planning for the holiday shipping race! From Black Friday to December 23rd, it’s always a rush to make sure items are delivered in time. Or maybe you’re just trying to ship one parcel in time for the holidays. Either way, the holiday season is swiftly approaching, and it’s time to start preparing. Here are your deadlines for USPS, UPS, and FedEx:

USPS 2021 Deadlines


Service TypeShipping Cutoff Date
Retail Ground™Wednesday, December 15th, 2021
First Class Mail®Friday, December 17th, 2021
Priority Mail®Saturday, December 18th, 2021
Priority Mail Express®Thursday, December 23rd, 2021

UPS 2021 Deadlines


Service TypeShipping Cutoff Date
Ground®Check UPS.com/CTC 
3 Day Select®Tuesday, December 21st, 2021
2nd Day Air® ServicesWednesday, December 22nd, 2021
Next Day Air®Thursday, December 23rd, 2021

FedEx 2021 Deadlines


Service TypeShipping Cutoff Date
FedEx SmartPost®Thursday, December 9th, 2021
FedEx Ground®Wednesday, December 15th, 2021
Home Delivery®Wednesday, December 15th, 2021
Express Saver®Tuesday, December 21st, 2021
2Day® ServicesWednesday, December 22nd, 2021
Overnight® ServicesThursday, December 23rd, 2021
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FREIGHT UPDATE 2021 q4
This update is a report that analyzes data from multiple sources, including but not limited to FreightWaves SONAR, DAT, American Shipper, Morgan Stanley Research, FTR Transportation Intelligence, Journal of Commerce, and National Retail Federation(NRF).

The broken record phrase of “freight volumes continue to rise” is still in play. The current Outbound Tender Volume Index is roughly 3% higher year-over-year (YOY). We get that 3% might sound and look like a minimal increase but keep in mind volumes were accelerating quickly over the last several months of 2020. So while the comps are more challenging as we get into the more difficult months of 2021, the volumes are still dominating what they were a year ago. Our team is digesting the 2021 peak season and the factors that are currently influencing the market. 

Ports Delays Continue to Rise 

Many anticipated a slowdown in import activity, as ports are overburdened with operations and equipment trying to keep up with the constant influx of ships waiting to unload their cargo. But that is hardly the case. While the numbers fluctuate from day to day, there were 70 container ships in the queue on Monday in late September 2021, with a total capacity of 432,909 twenty-foot equivalent units. To put the vastness of that number in perspective, that’s more than the inbound container volume the Port of Long Beach handled in the entire month of August. It’s roughly what Charleston handles inbound in four months and what Savannah handles in two. So why the boom? Well, consumers are spending. eCommerce, a rise in CPG, the upcoming holiday season are driving demand for imported goods, requiring ships for transportation.

What happens when the cargo finally reaches the port? First, available trucks will flock to these locations due to the increased pay possibilities that this freight represents. Second, shippers and retailers waiting for their long-dormant freight will pay above-market rates to get their goods rushed directly to their destinations.

Consumers Buying Trends Continue to Increase 

Consumer goods have encountered extensive growth since the start of the pandemic, and there are no signs of this trend slowing down. Employment numbers, a reliable predictor of spending, are the strongest since March of last year. While consumer spending did not need employment numbers to remain elevated for the past year, a more stable job market bodes well for the economic outlook and trends to continue. In August, consumer spending bounced back from a mid-summer lull. During the past month, it jumped .8% after a decline of .1% in July. Moreover, income rose by .2% as consumer prices increased by .4%.

Partner With a Logistics Solutions Provider to Navigate Peak Season 

Our team is here for you. No matter the situation, we’ve got your back. 

We are here as your partner — we are an extension of your team with a clear understanding of our responsibility to replicate the strategic business goals of your organization. No matter the size of your business, we help our customers achieve the best possible freight outcomes and decrease overall costs.

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B2B Fulfillment, B2C Fulfillment, Cold Supply Chain, eCommerce, eCommerce Fulfillment, Food & Beverage, Food Grade, Food Safety, Freight Brokerage, Fulfillment, Operations, Packaging, Processes, Retail, Safety, SQF, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Third Party Logistics, Transloading, Value-Added Services

On Dec. 6 and 7, the beverage industry will gather in person in Santa Monica, CA, to learn and take action at BevNet Live! Experts will speak to the community about innovations and challenges within the industry.

Team Taylor will be there, and we want to talk with you! We are here for you if you have any questions or want to chat on areas of interest in fulfillment, food-grade certifications, packaging, eCommerce, operations, supply chain management, and transportation.

Are you going to BevNet Live? Let us know!


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Carriers, Cold Supply Chain, Drayage, Flatbed, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Food & Beverage, Food Grade, Freight Brokerage, Intermodal Transportation, Inventory Management, Leadership, Operations, Port Services, Retail, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Technology, Third Party Logistics, Transloading, Truck Driving

If you’ve seen higher than expected freight rates, we hear you, we see you. There’s a couple of potential factors for these increases. Since Q2 of 2020, the freight markets have shown robust growth, which has raised rates dramatically. While this is good news for carriers and manufacturers, it has caused CPG shippers to pay the price in rising freight rates. In this week’s blog, our team analyzes the various factors that are driving up freight rates and why they are happening.

Factor 1 | Port Congestion 


With pandemic-related consumer shopping habits, many West Coast ports operated at maximum capacity during the summer. In 2021, the uptick in imports has compounded the situation and caused even more congestion. March retail sales increased by 9.8% sequentially and 14.3% year-over-year. A 27.7% jump led to an increase in sales of food services. With more imports on board, shippers should brace for capacity constraints. As the produce season gets underway, rates will also rise.

Factor 2 | Produce Season


The start of the produce season typically occurs in February in the southern US. By spring/summertime, it has reached the majority of the US. During this time, capacity is tightened as refrigerated carriers dedicate a lot of their space to hauling produce. Other products that can ship via dry van or on refrigerated trucks will move to van transport, thus increasing freight rates across the board.

Factor 3 | Reliance on Split Shipments 


eCommerce brands have been comprehensively using split shipments for years. Firstly goods need to be picked from inventories across different locations. With not enough room on a single truck or plane for an entire shipment, it may have to be divided into individual boxes and delivered individually. Split shipments happen to occur even more often during cross-country or international shipment of goods. The more the shipments, the costlier the shipping costs; therefore, the trend ends up being a pricey affair and often harmful to the shipping ecosystem.

Counter Rising Rates with these Techniques: 

Advance Planning


One of the most effective ways to combat these high freight rates is planning shipments far in advance. Cargo cost is increasing every day. To avoid paying surged charges and avail early bird facilities, companies have to plan their shipments well in advance strategically. Working with a team of transportation experts (Like Taylor) that uses digital platforms to leverage data on the freight costs to predict rates and trends affecting the rates will help to plan and lower costs. 

Work With A Team Of Experts

Work with a dedicated logistics team to ensure conditions do not endanger profitability. Teaming up with a partner like Taylor can help your organization correctly forecast costs and find more favorable pricing through consolidation or mode optimization services.

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Operations, Packaging, Retail, Third Party Logistics, Value-Added Services, Warehousing

This year is already shaping up to be a bit more “normal” than last but, there’s still a lack of in-person events, gatherings, sports, etc. In place of these events, we as a society have had over 365 days to come up with imaginative ways to engage with an audience that would typically be face to face. One creative solution is this idea of sending over a promotional kitted masterpiece; please don’t let the word promotional or promo deter you; we promise this isn’t another popsocket or portable charger that isn’t compatible with your phone. It’s much more extravagant than that; it’s unboxing a complete experience. This could be anything from a virtual reality headset to an HDMI that you plug into your TV to a cocktail creation kit (alcohol included, don’t worry). You’ve probably seen influencers on Instagram and TikTok open up the most outlandish PR gifts; the sky is truly the limit when it comes to these things. And while we aren’t the brains behind coming up with these deliverables, we are the brains behind making the experience come to life through kitting. You send us the items, boxes, bows, cards, confetti, and we’ll package it up nice and neatly and send it wherever you need to go. Have an idea but not sure what packaging or materials are necessary to make it happen? We’ve got you. Our team partners with an incredible sustainable packaging company that can make all your parcel, corrugated cardboard, dreams come to life.

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People Products Taylor Logistics  Inc

At Taylor, we know your products have important places to be, like a child’s 5th birthday, signing the papers for a new car, running a marathon, or happy hour. We’re here to help make sure they get there, from getting your products to Whole Foods or Ralphs to creating multipacks so people can enjoy more of your brand. We help brands explode & we go where you need us. We are your supply chain management experts.

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CPG Brand eCommerce

Noelle and Chris are back on the pod talking all things grocery and CPG trends. From which pandemic-related consumer behaviors are temporary vs. here to stay to the future of national grocery chains. Not to mention they talk groundhogs (yep), Kim Kardashian, and the NY Mets. Want to be on the next episode or have a topic you like us to cover? Inbox us at info@taylorlog.com

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