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Carriers, Cross-Docking, Customer Experience, Drayage, EDI, Flatbed, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Freight, Freight Brokerage, Freight Technology, Intermodal Transportation, Leadership, LTL, Ominchannel, Operations, Port Services, Processes, Safety, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Sustainability, Taylor Information, Technology, Third Party Logistics, Transloading, Truck Driving

CINCINNATI, Ohio. – MAY, 24th 2022—Taylor Logistics, a third-party logistics solutions provider, announced that it has partnered with project44 the world’s leading Advanced Visibility Platform™ for shippers and logistics service providers. 

Leveraging the power of the project44 cloud-based platform allows Taylor to increase operational efficiencies, reduce costs, improve shipping performance, and deliver an exceptional customer experience. Connected to thousands of carriers worldwide and having comprehensive coverage for all ELD and telematics devices, project44 supports all transportation modes and shipping types. 

“We are excited about our partnership with project44. This allows our customers complete visibility throughout the supply chain that we were missing on the front end,” said Vince Bonhaus, Vice President of Logistics, Taylor Logistics Inc. “project44 was the obvious choice for our growing business.” 

project44 is a Leader among Real-Time Transportation Visibility Providers, according to the Gartner Magic Quadrant. To learn more, visit www.project44.com

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Amazon, Amazon Fulfillment, B2B Fulfillment, B2C Fulfillment, Carriers, eCommerce, eCommerce Fulfillment, Essential Workers, Flatbed, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Food & Beverage, Food Grade, Food Safety, Freight, Freight Brokerage, Freight Technology, Fulfillment, Leadership, Ominchannel, Operations, Port Services, Processes, Safety, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Third Party Logistics, Transloading, Truck Driving

Well, Q1 2022 had no shortage of curveballs, from record-high gas and oil prices to the war in Ukraine and supply chain blockades lasting days on end, on top of record-high inflation. With the unpredictability of Q1, our team is taking a look at the trends and events as we dive into the start of Q2.

Key items to note:

Omnicron 2.0: Surprise, a new Covid variant, is making its course throughout the globe. This new BA.2 subvariant of Omicron could account for a surge in cases impacting consumer behavior. According to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week (04/04) BA.2 spreads 80% faster than the earlier Omicron, has more than doubled in the U.S. over two weeks and will become the dominant variant.

Inflation, Inflation, Inflation: Consumer demand remained strong throughout the quarter. But March has been unusually soft in the truckload freight market. Consumers just aren’t spending like they were in 2021. New research reveals that supply chain issues are exacerbating inflation. A recent study found that during 2022 trade is expected to expand further, due to a 16% increase in exports during 2021 and imports by 12%. Production levels have been unable to keep pace with demand leading to supply shortages and will limit import growth in 2022.

Ocean Freight: Container shipping costs are higher than ever and will stay high for the foreseeable future as importers continue to battle for space in the face of record demand for consumer goods from Asia. Covid resurgence in China disrupted productivity and the supply chain in March. Next potential disruption on-deck: West Coast Longshore Union contract expiration and negotiation.

Drivers: making headlines and making late-night television. Last Week Tonight with John Oliver had an entire 24-minute segment on, you guessed it, drivers (aired just last week). Now a 24-minute spot in any programming late night or news is pretty significant, and the transportation and trucking crisis in America is of the utmost importance. 70% of the US cargo is transported by truck; nearly everything you purchase comes to you by truck. That box of Mac & Cheese that’s been sitting in the pantry for a hot second – truck. Headphones – truck. Your dogs squeaky toy that has seen better days – truck. You get the point. 3.5 million truckers supply our goods in this country. But the entire industry is facing a crisis; there’s a lack of drivers, a pretty massive lack of drivers, and it’s only increasing year over year. Not just long-haul drivers but final-mile delivery drivers. Leading to an overall shortage on shelves, congestion, the domino effect.

Domestic Shipping: Consumer goods demand remains high, filling truck capacities on tight routes due to driver and equipment scarcities. Diesel fuel spiked when Russia invaded Ukraine. As a result, unprecedented ground freight cost is the norm across North America.

Leave the logistics to us. Talk with Taylor!


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Carriers, Cold Supply Chain, Customer Experience, Flatbed, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Food & Beverage, Food Grade, Food Safety, Freight, Freight Brokerage, Leadership, Ominchannel, Operations, Processes, Safety, SQF, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Third Party Logistics, Transloading
Freight impacts

Peak produce season is approaching; our team is breaking down the 2022 season, rate increases, transport practices, and capacity challenges. Even if you do not ship or grow produce, this season can directly impact your transportation performance and spending.

What is produce season?

Produce season in the United States generally begins in February and continues through July. It’s the period in which the most significant volume of fruits and vegetables are harvested and shipped to food manufacturers, grocery stores, and other vendors across the country. In February, growing and harvesting kick off in Mexico, and we start to see an influx of produce imports into the U.S. Then, in late March, the produce wave moves to the southeastern states, southern Texas and the Rio Grande Valley, and southern California and continues to move north as temperatures rise. 

The impact of produce season

Simply put, produce season it’s the rise in crop volumes and the elevated demand for trucks to transport these crops that impact capacity during this season. These factors lead to an upsurge in rates not only for shippers who utilize refrigerated trucks in harvesting areas but also for most shippers across other modes and regions.

How can you prepare for produce season? 

It’s important for shippers to closely watch how all these current issues may magnify the typical challenges of the season. Here’s what you can do to avoid the potential problems during this season:

Partner with a team of logistics experts to help keep you informed of changes in the freight market during produce season

Ship your freight as early as possible and add flexibility into your delivery date 

Factor in the longer lead time it may take to source trucks 

Consider multimodal shipping solutions to explore alternate transport options 

Talk With Taylor

Work with a partner that keeps you informed about the effects of the produce season and educates you on how to adjust your network in response to agricultural fluctuations.

Taylor has a vast network of qualified carriers across the country. In addition, we’ve built a rapport with trucks that produce routes regularly and can help you deftly navigate capacity jumps.

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Cross-Docking, Customer Experience, D2C, Drayage, Flatbed, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Intermodal Transportation, Ominchannel, Operations, Port Services, Processes, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Third Party Logistics, Transloading, Value-Added Services
Taylor Logistics Cross Dock

What is cross docking?


Cross docking is the transfer of inbound goods to an outbound carrier through the use of a cross docking facility – that is, a temporary storage terminal that cuts out or reduces the need for inventory storage. All incoming goods are sorted and loaded onto outbound trucks as quickly as possible – often immediately.

It’s trending!


The cross docking market is growing yet again! Globally it’s expected to reach US$342 billion by 2030 at a CAGR of around 6%. This growth is fueled by increasing consumer expectations for delivery times, putting pressure on the supply chain through the ‘need for speed’.

Cross docking benefits


Reduced costs, particularly any costs associated with long-term inventory storage and associated facilities, labor and utilities

Improved stock turnover, as the goal of cross docking is to get goods in and out as efficiently as possible

Minimized risk, given there’s reduced handling of goods and no long-term storage that could increase the chance of spoilage

Need a cross dock solution? Talk with Taylor!


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Cold Supply Chain, Cross-Docking, Drayage, eCommerce, eCommerce Fulfillment, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Freight, Freight Brokerage, Freight Technology, Intermodal Transportation, Internet of Things, Inventory Management, LTL, Operations, Port Services, Processes, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Third Party Logistics, TMS, Transloading, Truck Driving

Halloween is this weekend; pumpkin-spiced everything has been taking up menu real estate at your local coffee shop for some time, and turkey is right around the corner. So not only is it the start of the holiday season, but it’s also the start of peak shipping season. Our experts give pointers on how to succeed during this busy season and how 2021 is already shaping up differently from years past.

What is peak season shipping?

There are four seasons of freight shipping and the peak season of shipping starts at the end of the summer. This time is considered a peak shipping season because there is a combination of demand from different markets. Businesses start stocking up for the upcoming holiday season, there is back-to-school shopping time, and retailers try to sell out their inventories from the summer season. During this peak time, freight rates are at the highest, and the capacity is tight.

What are the four seasons of freight shipping?

  • The Quiet Shipping Season (January – March)
  • The Produce Shipping Season (April – July)
  • The Peak Shipping Season (August – October)
  • The Holiday Shipping Season (November – December)

How to be successful throughout the peak shipping season

Knowing the market


The key to navigating peak shipping season is to understand the truckload demand and market specifics across various industries. In 2020, demand was low, and freight rates were higher than usual. In 2021 however, shippers are less cost-sensitive, and freight volumes are extremely hot. If you plan to work with high-quality carriers, start navigating the market during spring and early summer. Create a proper shipping strategy to help you define the market trends and successfully ship goods. 

Utilize Technology


During the peak shipping season, you need every advantage you can get! Here’s an example, you can efficiently utilize a transportation management system (TMS) to optimize route planning and ensure efficient deliveries. You can also use other supply chain technology to automate warehousing processes and inventory control, providing up-to-the-minute data on your entire operation.

Work with reliable a 3PL 


Reliable 3PL here, and we will make sure you have fast and reliable shipping services. Our team knows that freight, more often than not, is time-sensitive, and capacity can be tight. So we work with a wide variety of professional, high-quality carriers to ensure your products are delivered timely and with ease. 

Talk With Taylor


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Carriers, Cold Supply Chain, Cross-Docking, Drayage, Flatbed, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Food & Beverage, Freight, Freight Brokerage, Freight Technology, LTL, Ominchannel, Operations, Port Services, Processes, Retail, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Technology, Third Party Logistics, TMS, Transloading, Truck Driving
FREIGHT UPDATE 2021 q4
This update is a report that analyzes data from multiple sources, including but not limited to FreightWaves SONAR, DAT, American Shipper, Morgan Stanley Research, FTR Transportation Intelligence, Journal of Commerce, and National Retail Federation(NRF).

The broken record phrase of “freight volumes continue to rise” is still in play. The current Outbound Tender Volume Index is roughly 3% higher year-over-year (YOY). We get that 3% might sound and look like a minimal increase but keep in mind volumes were accelerating quickly over the last several months of 2020. So while the comps are more challenging as we get into the more difficult months of 2021, the volumes are still dominating what they were a year ago. Our team is digesting the 2021 peak season and the factors that are currently influencing the market. 

Ports Delays Continue to Rise 

Many anticipated a slowdown in import activity, as ports are overburdened with operations and equipment trying to keep up with the constant influx of ships waiting to unload their cargo. But that is hardly the case. While the numbers fluctuate from day to day, there were 70 container ships in the queue on Monday in late September 2021, with a total capacity of 432,909 twenty-foot equivalent units. To put the vastness of that number in perspective, that’s more than the inbound container volume the Port of Long Beach handled in the entire month of August. It’s roughly what Charleston handles inbound in four months and what Savannah handles in two. So why the boom? Well, consumers are spending. eCommerce, a rise in CPG, the upcoming holiday season are driving demand for imported goods, requiring ships for transportation.

What happens when the cargo finally reaches the port? First, available trucks will flock to these locations due to the increased pay possibilities that this freight represents. Second, shippers and retailers waiting for their long-dormant freight will pay above-market rates to get their goods rushed directly to their destinations.

Consumers Buying Trends Continue to Increase 

Consumer goods have encountered extensive growth since the start of the pandemic, and there are no signs of this trend slowing down. Employment numbers, a reliable predictor of spending, are the strongest since March of last year. While consumer spending did not need employment numbers to remain elevated for the past year, a more stable job market bodes well for the economic outlook and trends to continue. In August, consumer spending bounced back from a mid-summer lull. During the past month, it jumped .8% after a decline of .1% in July. Moreover, income rose by .2% as consumer prices increased by .4%.

Partner With a Logistics Solutions Provider to Navigate Peak Season 

Our team is here for you. No matter the situation, we’ve got your back. 

We are here as your partner — we are an extension of your team with a clear understanding of our responsibility to replicate the strategic business goals of your organization. No matter the size of your business, we help our customers achieve the best possible freight outcomes and decrease overall costs.

Talk With Taylor

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B2B Fulfillment, B2C Fulfillment, Cold Supply Chain, eCommerce, eCommerce Fulfillment, Food & Beverage, Food Grade, Food Safety, Freight Brokerage, Fulfillment, Operations, Packaging, Processes, Retail, Safety, SQF, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Team Taylor, Third Party Logistics, Transloading, Value-Added Services

On Dec. 6 and 7, the beverage industry will gather in person in Santa Monica, CA, to learn and take action at BevNet Live! Experts will speak to the community about innovations and challenges within the industry.

Team Taylor will be there, and we want to talk with you! We are here for you if you have any questions or want to chat on areas of interest in fulfillment, food-grade certifications, packaging, eCommerce, operations, supply chain management, and transportation.

Are you going to BevNet Live? Let us know!


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Carriers, Cold Supply Chain, Drayage, Flatbed, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Food & Beverage, Food Grade, Freight Brokerage, Intermodal Transportation, Inventory Management, Leadership, Operations, Port Services, Retail, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Technology, Third Party Logistics, Transloading, Truck Driving

If you’ve seen higher than expected freight rates, we hear you, we see you. There’s a couple of potential factors for these increases. Since Q2 of 2020, the freight markets have shown robust growth, which has raised rates dramatically. While this is good news for carriers and manufacturers, it has caused CPG shippers to pay the price in rising freight rates. In this week’s blog, our team analyzes the various factors that are driving up freight rates and why they are happening.

Factor 1 | Port Congestion 


With pandemic-related consumer shopping habits, many West Coast ports operated at maximum capacity during the summer. In 2021, the uptick in imports has compounded the situation and caused even more congestion. March retail sales increased by 9.8% sequentially and 14.3% year-over-year. A 27.7% jump led to an increase in sales of food services. With more imports on board, shippers should brace for capacity constraints. As the produce season gets underway, rates will also rise.

Factor 2 | Produce Season


The start of the produce season typically occurs in February in the southern US. By spring/summertime, it has reached the majority of the US. During this time, capacity is tightened as refrigerated carriers dedicate a lot of their space to hauling produce. Other products that can ship via dry van or on refrigerated trucks will move to van transport, thus increasing freight rates across the board.

Factor 3 | Reliance on Split Shipments 


eCommerce brands have been comprehensively using split shipments for years. Firstly goods need to be picked from inventories across different locations. With not enough room on a single truck or plane for an entire shipment, it may have to be divided into individual boxes and delivered individually. Split shipments happen to occur even more often during cross-country or international shipment of goods. The more the shipments, the costlier the shipping costs; therefore, the trend ends up being a pricey affair and often harmful to the shipping ecosystem.

Counter Rising Rates with these Techniques: 

Advance Planning


One of the most effective ways to combat these high freight rates is planning shipments far in advance. Cargo cost is increasing every day. To avoid paying surged charges and avail early bird facilities, companies have to plan their shipments well in advance strategically. Working with a team of transportation experts (Like Taylor) that uses digital platforms to leverage data on the freight costs to predict rates and trends affecting the rates will help to plan and lower costs. 

Work With A Team Of Experts

Work with a dedicated logistics team to ensure conditions do not endanger profitability. Teaming up with a partner like Taylor can help your organization correctly forecast costs and find more favorable pricing through consolidation or mode optimization services.

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Cincinnati, Drayage, Intermodal Transportation, Transloading
Taylor Logistics Inc. Transloading in Cincinnati Ohio Drayage Team

Transloading services are an essential part of the supply chain, primarily when shipping with intermodal drayage. When cargo is moved from rail to a truck (or the other way around), the transloading area is where an experienced team uses forklifts, cranes, and other equipment to ensure a seamless transfer of freight. Often, shippers want to combine the economic advantages of rail shipping with the flexibility of over-the-road trucking, using affordable rail shipping for the long haul and trucks for final delivery. Here’s our drayage team tips on how to save:

But First, Products That Can Be Transloaded


Standard Rail Commodities: Lumber, metals, paper, rebar bundles, palletized products


Liquids: Ethanol, biodiesel


Oversized: Transformers, wind blades, and machinery


Bulk: Sand, plastic pellets, food product


Service Sensitive/Critical: Auto parts, parcel, frozen food, and perishables


Everything: Bricks, floor tile, coil, solar panels and nearly everything else 

Container Capacity


Don’t waste container space! Abiding by container rules and regulations, strive to consolidate as much freight as possible into a larger container. For example, the contents of three 40 ft containers can fit into two 53 footers. Thus, reducing your overall costs significantly..

Check Your Container Cartons


If your container is hauling more cartons than the allocated number, you could incur extra fees. Stay up to date on regulations to avoid paying more.

Try To Palletize Your Products


To save space, putting your product on pallets always helps. When freight arrives at the transloading area, palletize cargo to make distribution handling more efficient.

Partner With A 3PL


Taylor has a full drayage team of transportation professionals that know what to look for to help you cut costs and streamline your supply chain with transloading.

Talk With Taylor


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Carriers, Flatbed Transportation, Fleet, Freight Brokerage, Intermodal Transportation, LTL, Port Services, Team Taylor, Transloading, Truck Driving
Freight Shipping Transportation Taylor Logistics

Your favorite co-hosts, Chris Baum and Noelle Taylor, are back covering a full range of topics from port to door services, the lunar new year, expecting the unexpected, and drop trailer services.

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