Good Contents Are Everywhere, But Here, We Deliver The Best of The Best.Please Hold on!
9756 International Blvd Cincinnati, OH 45246 513.771.1850
Processes, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Technology, Third Party Logistics
Taylor Logistics Inc. Blog

On February 2, 2020, millions of people at home will tune in to Super Bowl LIV. Thousands more will travel to Miami, Flordia, to see the San Fransico 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs face-off (plus, enjoy the halftime performances of Jennifer Lopez and Shakira). So, how does one of the most notable sporting events in the world meet the demands of fans, players, attendees, and others?

Think about all of the various supply chains that move within the Super Bowl. From footballs, uniforms, and helmets for players to microphones and cameras for the media. There are t-shirts, and hats for fans, plus beer, nachos, and soda for attendees. The field requires materials for maintenance, paint, and signs. These are just a few examples of the many things affected by logistics at the Super Bowl.

The introduction of ELDs, lack of drivers, and rising rates have created a mixture of anxiety throughout the shipping industry- especially when it comes to timely events. Fortunately, shippers can prepare some products for the big game in advance. For instance, beverages have a longer shelf life so that they can be moved to retailers days, sometimes weeks, in advance. However, some products are time-sensitive. Staple Super Bowl snacks like chicken wings can’t move truckloads too far in advance, making visibility and real-time notifications critical. Without these things, a load might be lost and will create a loss of revenue and market share – a massive deal on Super Bowl Sunday.

Taylor can work with you to identify new opportunities in your supply chain; whether it be in your fulfillment processes, route optimization, or distribution, we can evaluate the supply chain and offer your insightful feedback to make it more efficient.

0

B2B Fulfillment, B2C Fulfillment, Fulfillment, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Warehousing

Warehouse: 

A warehouse typically refers to the establishment that a customer’s products are stored for a specified period. Warehouses generally are less high-energy than distribution centers. Sorting items, shipping them out, and replenishing stock are all a part of the daily functions. Distribution centers can act as warehouses too, but warehouses can’t double as a distribution center. Warehouses can be designed to receive goods directly from railways, airports, or seaports, and are usually equipped with forklifts and even cranes for moving and organizing products. 


Distribution Center (DC):

A distribution center is slightly more complex than a warehouse in that it’s a more high-velocity operation as opposed to a static warehouse. Meaning that a distribution center offers more services to clients, whether they’re internal or external. A DC is generally thought of as demand-driven. 


Fulfillment Center (FC):

A warehouse facility focused on order fulfillment in which the company fulfills its obligation to send a person a finished good. Typically refers to services of a store, either brick, and mortar or e-commerce: orders received, packaged, and shipped to end consumers. 


0

Freight, Freight Brokerage, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Taylor Information, Third Party Logistics

Taylor Logistics the Nation’s most progressive family owned logistics company announced that they increased their freight broker surety bond through the Transportation Intermediaries Association from $100,000 to $250,000, further confirming its commitment to protecting the freight and transportation community against fraudulent behavior

0